Blog


Feedback

February 17, 2015

Feedback

 

Negotiation requires listening to different perspectives that often conflict with how we see ourselves and our world.  This is feedback.  It’s hard to give and hard to take.

 

It's hard because of our insecurities.

 

It's necessary in order to make positive changes in how we behave and to be able to grow.

 

What can we do to overcome the pain of feedback?  The only way to face our fear of feedback is to engage in a process that fosters safe dialogue, including both deep honesty and empathy.

 

How can we safely engage in conflict (including giving and receiving feedback) in order to grow and improve our relationships? 

 

Relationships continue after divorce, especially if there are children.  Learning to resolve conflict is an ongoing process for all of us.  Our abilities positively or negatively affect our lives and the lives of those around us. People must feel safe to discuss their concerns and interests.  Once fear of vulnerability is removed, people can aspire to their higher good and find excellent solutions. 

 

How do we apply this to feedback?

 

What’s required is a change of heart - from negative, evaluative feedback to appreciation. 

 

Try to find new truth in what is being said.  Know it’s a process of understanding that each person is a culture and sees things differently.  Build trust by buffering individual differences with feelings of appreciation, seeing the innocence and insecurity in others and understanding them.  Take feedback with a mind open to change, new information, curiosity, wanting to get better.

 

What are the tools?

  • Positive Affinity

George Pransky in his Relationship Handbook  says compassion is our innate, personal lubricant that helps us get along with others.  When we feel compassion we are in a healthy state of mind and have the wisdom to know how to respond.  It’s a blanket of warm feelings that protects us from the rough edges of personalities.  It protects us from harsh self-judgment and raises our spirits.   It allows the other person to regain a sense of security.  We can bring out the best in others if they feel safe.

  • Trust

Trust in oneself.   Innate trust is defined by Philip Moffit as “the understanding that if you live mindfully moment to moment and have the intention to act according to your values even in difficult or confusing situations, your life will unfold in the most harmonious manner possible.”  Innate trust is unconditional.  It allows us to engage in feedback with understanding, empathy and compassion as well as the confidence to express our needs and set boundaries.

  • Non-Defensive Communication

We know feedback is important for our relationships, our growth and our development.  The key is to be able to deliver and accept feedback in a way that doesn’t provoke defensiveness.   Sharon Strand Ellison, author of Taking the War Out of Our Words – The Art of Powerful Non-Defensive Communication, says we reduce defensiveness by using basic communication tools -asking questions, making statements and making predictions.

 

Questions:  Asking questions with real curiosity and authenticity for the purpose of gathering information.  A “safe question” is one that establishes the subjectivity of each person’s viewpoint and assists us in remaining separate from someone else’s judgment.

 

Statements:  Making statements that are open and direct, being vulnerable and unguarded with no hidden agenda.  We state our needs, desires and goals directly.  A non-defensive statement is subjective, descriptive and lays it all out on the table.  We no longer defend ourselves and try to control how the other person is reacting.  It encourages accountability and clarification and results in personal growth.

 

Predictions:  These are not threats or manipulations.  With predictions we foretell what can be the consequences of certain actions or choices.  They must be given with neutrality, be definitive and absolute.  The function is to create security for ourselves and others through predictability.  Predictions protect us and create clear boundaries.

 

Mediators and collaborative practitioners strive to create the safety necessary for people to express their interests, listen to the concerns of others and offer common solutions.  Compassionate and constructive feedback is what we encourage for ourselves and the families we serve.  We would all do well to focus on non-defensive communication and the innate qualities of compassion and trust as a strategy for conflict resolution, personal growth and professional development.




Comments


Return to Blog Main Page














RSS 2.0   Atom